attraction

Russia’s interference in the 2016 US presidential election, and its suspected hacking of French President Emmanuel Macron’s campaign servers, should surprise no one, given President Vladimir Putin’s (mis)understanding of soft power. Before his re-election in 2012, Putin told a Moscow newspaper that “soft power is a complex of tools and methods to achieve foreign policy goals without the use of force, through information and other means of influence.”

On the evolving concept of "soft power" and key challenges facing U.S. public diplomacy.

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The newest list of crucial PD publications from Bruce Gregory is out now, featuring work from P. J. Crowley, Geoffrey Cowan, AEI, and RAND.
 
September 11, 2015

This week’s public diplomacy news headlines showcased the role of soft power in seducing global publics. 

Obviously, Putin fears European soft power, since it is a force to which he has no response.  Russia’s lack of attraction is one of its most serious weak spots. Its leverage rests on its state-controlled extracting industries and its military. 

North Korea’s approach to marketing itself to foreign visitors has often been contradictory, the product of competing bureaucracies and the changing whims of the leadership.  In this environment, North Korean authorities can often seem hungry for foreign visitors one minute, then going out of their way to frighten them off the next.

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