brexit

Brexit challenges Britain's global image of openness and tolerance, but Cool Britannia has what it takes to avoid being suddenly rebranded as uncool just because it quits the EU, advertising professionals say. [...] "The things that make British culture unique remain. Music, fashion, British content, creative content, television, film. I would say all those things are not at risk, because they are driven by creative people," said Scheckner.

Speaking to an audience of industry leaders, Carolyn will praise the UK’s reputation as the world’s creative centre. The sector’s positive economic and cultural impact plays a vital role promoting the UK to the rest of the world. As new opportunities open up in both established and emerging markets post-Brexit, Carolyn will outline how important it is that a new migration system cements the UK’s global reputation for this industry.

British Universities have always been considered the global gold standard for quality but Brexit, in combination with reduced government funding, immigration policy, a changing 18 year-old demographic and the Higher Education and Research Bill, has created ‘A Perfect Storm’ for the sector. Universities are big business. Last year there were 2.24 million students at British universities.

The soft power capabilities of the EU are weakening for a number of reasons, including institutional confusion, Brexit, the Refugee crisis, terrorism, the rise of populism, resistance among member states to further enlargement given the Union’s economic problems. [...] Given this situation, political developments in the Western Balkans that have a direct impact on regional security must be closely monitored.

According to a UNESCO report in 2012, South Africa, the US, and Canada are among the most popular destinations for Nigerian students. But they are dwarfed in popularity by the UK with nearly 18,000 Nigerian students annually. The cultural and educational exchange organisation, the British Council, estimated that Nigerians would become the second biggest cohort of foreign students in the UK after Chinese in the coming years, with one MP estimating the number will reach 30,000. That was before the Brexit vote.

With British Prime Minister May set to arrive in Ankara today to meet her Turkish counterpart, Binali Yıldırım, experts highlighted the importance of her visit, especially right after her trip to the U.S. Commenting on the visit, diplomatic sources in Ankara stated, "Prime Minister May's visit will reflect the fact that Turkey is an indispensable partner and a close ally for the U.K. on many issues of global importance, including trade, security and defense."

In November, 2016 Oxford Dictionaries proclaimed “post-truth” the word of the year. The choice was obviously a reflection of two important political campaigns: Brexit and the US Presidential elections. In both campaigns truth became subservient to political gain. The distinction between fact and fiction eroded as fake news spread globally through social media sites. However, Oxford Dictionaries’ choice was, to a certain extent, a publicity stunt in its own right.

Ireland must engage in a deeper way with its diaspora in order to prosper in a world of increasing uncertainty, Tim O’Connor, a former senior Irish diplomat, told a gathering of Irish-Americans in Dublin on Tuesday evening. Ahead of Donald Trump’s presidency in the US and the UK’s forthcoming departure from the EU, he said that now was not a moment to be thinking small.

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