brexit

The first London Design Festival was launched in 2003. Since then, around 130 cities across the world have set up their own version. Why? Design is key to building a successful creative economy and a festival is a major gateway to individual creative industries.

The UK is currently the primary location for TV broadcasting in Europe. [...] However, as the UK prepares to leave the European single market, questions arise about whether they can continue their business there or whether they need to relocate some operations to preserve access.

When Kate Middleton and Prince William went to Poland and Germany, they were sent there on a Brexit “charm offensive” to help ease the tensions as Great Britain begins negotiations to exit the EU. The couple did more than charm the locals. They created magic.

Inquiries from overseas prosecutors to their British counterparts about cyber crime have soared, underscoring the vital role the UK plays for investigators and criminals alike.High quality global journalism requires investment. The number of so-called Mutual Legal Assistance requests from foreign authorities to the UK relating to cyber crime jumped by 12 per cent in 2016, to 1,855, according to Home Office statistics gleaned through a Freedom of Information request.

Britain may lack hard power, but the soft power of influence and a network of relationships deriving from decades of active and assiduous diplomacy still count for something. [...] Britain is one of the leading supporters of the new style of Chinese economic diplomacy, involving the furthering of solid infrastructural links along which mutually beneficial trade and investment can flow to an increasingly interlinked world.

 

Many view Europe as a spent force in global politics. Conventional wisdom states that world politics today is unipolar, with the United States as the sole superpower. Or perhaps it is multipolar, with China, India, and the rest rising to challenge Western powers. Either way, Europe's role is secondary - and declining. The European Union, it is said, is too weak to avoid withering away in the face of Russian subversion, mass migration, right-wing revolt, British plans to leave, slow growth, and anemic defense spending.

As the UK prepares to leave the EU, it has a huge number of considerations to ensure its economy prospers. One, which is perhaps overlooked, is Britain’s language policy and how important this is as an economic resource. A strategic language policy and the cultivation of language experts in post-Brexit Britain are essential if it wants to connect with fresh markets overseas. This has long been a feature of international diplomacy—stretching back long before globalization as we know it. 

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