Daesh

Canada is combating terrorism by improving “social cohesion” in Lebanon, which is inundated with Syrian refugees. Can it possibly work? [...] It is a subtle weapon; social cohesion improvements lack the immediate impact of a bomb. But can good intentions, friendly smiles and linking words be an effective response to terrorism?

Marines Share American Tradition With Iraqi Highway Patrol, by DVIDSHUB

Despite current low levels of trust toward the U.S. from the Iraqi populace, not all hope is lost.

Iraq School, by Angie Johnston

Despite working closely with Iraq against the Islamic State, the U.S. is still regarded with suspicion.

Can the U.S. Actually Defeat ISIS?, by Day Donaldson

Challenging ISIS has little to do with decreasing their number of Twitter followers.

Is the Kingdom on a true path of reform?

The loss of Palmyra, which was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980, was one of ISIS’s biggest setbacks since the group declared itself a caliphate in 2014. […] [Maamoun] Abdulkarim said he and other historians and archaeologists would travel to Palmyra to more deeply assess the damage, and to plan how they’ll restore the ancient ruins and sites. 

One of the objectives set out as part of the Netwar in Cyberia Research Project is to produce a strategic-level assessment of the information environment in which extremist groups operate. This will allow an analysis of collective and emergent behaviors within complex information systems and the identification of factors which could influence the success of Public Diplomacy responses to Jihadist online content.

Cyber Attacks, by Christiaan Colen

Forget proxy metrics and studying a single Twitter list—this is what Jihadist information dissemination really looks like.

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