dennis rodman

Using Dennis Rodman as a case study, a new article examines the role of high-profile athletes in sports diplomacy.

2017 has become the year when absurd jokes appear to be coming true. When Dennis Rodman made his first trip to North Korea back in 2013, it was amusing to imagine the eccentric NBA legend acting as the United States’ de facto ambassador to the country. [...] In an interview with Good Morning Britain, the five-time NBA champion offered to “straighten things out” between Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, emphasizing that he considers both men friends.

Headlines explore innovative public diplomacy campaigns featuring food, beer and music.

The Worm has returned. On Tuesday, former NBA great Dennis Rodman flew back to North Korea during a time of heightened tensions with Washington, after the rogue state's 16 missile tests so far this year, and its arrest of two more U.S. citizens, bringing the total number of Americans held by the regime to four. It's at least the fourth trip to North Korea for Rodman, who was previously hosted in 2013 and 2014 by Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un, a known basketball fanatic.

A look back at public diplomacy with North Korea, from Dennis Rodman to the BBC.

Sport and cultural exchanges between countries and individuals “who are not on the best of terms” could help ease tensions, Spavor said in an interview. “At the very least, the involved individuals … can break down or dismiss preconceived negative ideas about each other.”

The problem with “Dennis Rodman: Big Bang in Pyongyang,” primarily, is that the filmmakers decided to make a film about Dennis Rodman going to North Korea. The 93-minute documentary promises the unmistakable stench of a shit-show just in the title alone. So it’s not that surprising to discover that “Dennis Rodman: Big Bang in Pyongyang” is awful — both in the “shock and awe” sort of awful, as well as in the “absolutely terrible and affronting to humanity” kind of way.

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