embassies

Ilan Manor on the historical relationship between diplomacy and technology, and how it can help a world in crisis.

A security checklist for business travellers from Cari Guittard.

Digital diplomacy is a hot topic. Embassies all over the world increasingly use social media as a low-cost and convenient tool to promote their countries, inform people about their latest activities and engage with their followers. Many embassies can be found on Facebook, Twitter or Youtube, but also on China’s Sina Weibo or WeChat, changing the way foreign embassies engage with with local audiences in China.
 

Tips from Corneliu Bjola on addressing crisis communication and online backlash.

The migration of ministries of foreign affairs (MFAs) to social media is by no means a new occurrence. Indeed, the Israeli, Swedish, and American MFAs have been active on Twitter for nearly a decade. It may therefore be time to investigate if MFAs have mastered the use of social media to attain diplomatic goals—be it conversing with foreign populations, gathering information on other nations' foreign policies, or narrating a coherent national image. 

WIPO Celebrates Visionary Innovators, by U.S. Mission Geneva

It's time to evaluate how much diplomacy has gone digital.

Every year Cultural Tourism DC, in conjunction with international embassies, hosts the famous "Around the World" and "Shortcut to Europe" open house series. This tremendous two day event spaced over two weekends, gives visitors the chance to tour more than 70 embassies where they can learn about different cultures through food, art and music. But what happens if you are not in town during this once a year grand event? If you want a similar effect, consider staying at a hostel.

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