food diplomacy

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This video interview recounts a U.S. State Department-led collaboration between two chefs—one American, one Pakistani—that resulted in a miniseries for a popular Pakistani TV food network.

Chef Outta Water presents a series of food events from Thursday, Sept. 28, to Sunday, Oct. 8, that are an exchange of flavors, friendship and business opportunities between Australia and Oregon. Australian Chef Michael Brine from Townsville, North Queensland, will be the ‘chef outta water’ teaming up with Astoria’s Chef Chris Holen as part of a local makers and food producers tour though Astoria, Portland, Hood River, Bend, and McMinnville. Brine will use his skill to pair ‘down under’ flavors with Oregon produce.

For a majority of Indians living in metropolitans, a meal at a restaurant consists of the usual Chinese, Italian and American fare with Japanese food presumably lying somewhere at the bottom of the list of preferred cuisines. However, if Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his way, gastronomic delights from the land of the rising sun will enthrall the tastebuds of more and more Indians with the PM inviting Japanese business community to open more restaurants chains throughout the country.

What can be done to prevent war, restore peace and address terrorism in a world that is full of conflict? Food, a basic necessity that many take for granted, has been one powerful tool that has been used to address issues of conflict and violence. Delaware Valley University’s graduate public policy program’s Policy in Practice Series and the Food Systems Institute are proud to present a lecture on the impact of food on war and peace efforts.

Taiwanese eats are a key part of the country's soft power in Asia, and this is never any truer than it is for South Koreans. Tourists from the country are easy to spot in every Carrefour, filling their baskets with local snacks. Chief among them are pineapple cakes, the buttery pastry filled with sweet pineapple-flavored jam that may or may not contain actual pineapple.

Refugee Cooks Take Over European Kitchens

Following World Refugee Day, a look at how some refugees practice cultural exchange through cuisine.

A little bit crab apple, a little bit cherimoya, the ambitious atemoya hopes for soft power prowess and export success. When the atemoya (鳳梨釋迦)  was first exported from Taiwan in 2008, its sales quickly surpassed that of other Taiwanese staples, including mangoes and pineapples.

Visitors of Embassy Chef Challenge can sample authentic cuisines from 35 countries in a single day. One minute they can enjoy salmon ceviche and merquén mussels from Chile, and the next, jollof rice with chicken and fried plantains from Ghana. Adults can taste wines from Bolivia or the iconic gin-based cocktail from Singapore, the Singapore Sling. [...] “It’s a very happy place,” said Red Garcia, the chef representing the Philippines. “Food is like music. We break bread, and we share our culture and values. Everyone brings the best of everything.”