medical diplomacy

June 11, 2018

A look into Cuba's early public diplomacy efforts that shaped the country's global image.

Efforts by the Republic of China (Taiwan) in assisting its diplomatic allies through medical aid reflect the country’s soft power and commitment to advancing global health, according to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs June 13. The success of Taiwan’s annual international medical mission in the Marshall Islands serves as a prime example in these regards, MOFA Deputy Minister Paul Wen-liang Chang said, adding that the country will continue to strengthen bilateral collaboration with the South Pacific ally to help improve its medical care.

Cuba has emerged an unlikely victor in health care. The Cuban Revolution served as a catalyst for improved medical services and universal treatment on the island. Although Fidel Castro’s vision for a Cuba mejor stemmed from his political mantra, the country’s most successful social program can ultimately be credited to the medical training of former revolutionary Che Guevara. 

Medical diplomacy is the kind of foreign policy tool that the world’s most powerful nation should embrace. [...] Nations such as the United States that have the financial and logistical ability to respond to these epidemics should accept their moral responsibility to do so. In the case of the United States, “America first” does not mean “America only.” Spending a tiny fraction of this country’s wealth to save lives should be done without a second thought.

World AIDS Day Mural

PEPFAR is key to U.S. medical diplomacy and should be protected, writes Philip Seib. 

The head of medical assistance of the Cuban brigade in Bolivia, Alina Ochoa, highlighted today the impact of the Health Fairs that since 2016 Cuban collaborators carry out here. [...] Only in 2016, we offered more than 198,000 consultations, the doctor specified, and also said that the work of the Cuban Medical Brigade in Bolivia finds support in the Ministry of Health of the Plurinational State.

February 8, 2017

Cuba is proud of its government-run health care system and its skilled doctors. But even with a raise two years ago, the highest paid doctors make $67 a month, while nurses top out at $40. That leaves many feeling demoralized — and searching for ways to improve their lives.

Health officials from across China visited the University of Birmingham to learn more about how British medical staff deliver healthcare to patients. A group of 25 senior officials from departments at the National Health and Family Planning Commission (NHFPC) and other medical institutions across 10 provinces and cities travelled to the University. Their visit was part of a project supported by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office that gave health professionals the opportunity to learn about the UK’s system of healthcare delivery.

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