news media

Journalism Aircraft Landscape, by Gabito222

The Voice of America was never intended to do investigative reporting, nor should it.

“A decent respect to the opinions of mankind,” intones the U.S. Declaration of Independence, requires that those who want to break away from a nation-state explain publicly their reasons for doing so. Today, however, following a dramatic week of events connected to the ascent of Donald Trump to the Presidency, a similar imperative requires that we try to explain to the world—and most of all to ourselves—what is going on. 

Thank You Tour 2016, by Michael Vadon

Examining Trump's recent controversies to understand the Presidency in the coming months.

Israel Flag Omagh, by Kenneth Allen

As evidenced by the Masot case, the distinctions between acceptable and non-acceptable diplomatic practices are blurring.

The latest headlines should worry all those who follow communications issues. Not only is President-elect Trump’s approach to mass media and public communication radically different from anything that has come before, there is a broad and unnerving debate — with Trump at the center — involving media, policy makers and political partisans over how to regard Russia and its apparent interference in the U.S. Presidential election.

The President-elect's communication skills leave something to be desired, says Mark Dillen.

LRO Press Conference, by NASA Goddard Space Flight

According to Markos Kounalakis, America's news ecosystem is segmented and locally-focused, leading to less knowledge of global events.

Those in charge of foreign policy, be they the president of the United States or the prime minister of Great Britain, face situations their predecessors never experienced. Literally every important event around the globe is instantaneously reported, most of the time on television. 

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