korean peninsula

Moon Jae-In's election in South Korea and the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics made people-to-people exchanges between the divided Koreas possible again.

The joint North Korea-South Korea women's hockey team to compete at this year's Winter Games marks a new step in Olympic history, says Robert Dunbar. 

David Kang: Korea's Soft Power Under Threat: North Korea and the Korean Peninsula

The USC Korean Studies Institute director highlights the powerful pull of rhetoric when it comes to U.S. media messages about North Korea.

Ms. Enna Park, Ambassador for Public Diplomacy, Korean Ministry of Foreign Affairs

At a recent CPD event, Amb. Enna Park emphasized the importance of public diplomacy and soft power in ensuring S. Korea's continued success.

[Foreign Correspondents] Sports diplomacy for the PyeongChang Winter Olympics

Arirang TV looks at the impact of the 2018 winter games on North Korea-South Korea relations.

The United Nations Security Council will vote on Friday on a U.S. and Chinese proposal to blacklist more North Korean individuals and entities after the country's repeated ballistic missile launches, diplomats said on Thursday. The draft resolution, seen by Reuters, would sanction four entities, including the Koryo Bank and Strategic Rocket Force of the Korean People's Army, and 14 people, including Cho Il U, who is believed to head North Korea's overseas spying operations.

South Korea and the US’s tentative agreement to hold a summit in Washington as early as the end of June appears to mean that both sides recognize the need to fill the gap in summit diplomacy, created by the impeachment of former president Park Geun-hye, as soon as possible. At the same time, the Blue House also seems determined to quickly dispel US concerns about South Korea’s new president, Moon Jae-in.

Speaking during his formal oath-taking ceremony on Wednesday, Moon pledged to work for peace on the Korean Peninsula amid growing worry over the North's expanding nuclear weapons and missiles programme. "I am willing to go anywhere for the peace of the Korean Peninsula," Moon said. "If needed, I will fly immediately to Washington. I will go to Beijing and I will go to Tokyo. If the conditions shape up, I will go to Pyongyang."

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