twitter diplomacy

Twitter has become the new soapbox of diplomats. It’s even given rise to a new lexicon — twiplomats practicing twiplomacy.  Indeed, the website Twiplomacy writes that Twitter has become the “channel of choice for digital diplomacy between world leaders, governments, foreign ministries and diplomats.”

January 4, 2016

Members of the Twitterati might be useful in spreading a new kind of American diplomacy abroad. "We need to use soft power in hard places," says one of America's top diplomats, and social media is just the way to apply it. [...] He's (Undersecretary Stengel) looking to the country's artists, musicians, athletes and citizens abroad to be the engines of discourse, amplified and distributed through the power of the Internet, mobile phones and social networks.

 

With Iran and world powers close to a nuclear deal, Israel's prime minister has launched a Twitter account in Farsi to reach out to the Iranian public. [...] Netanyahu's office said Monday that the Farsi account will publish content similar to Netanyahu's English and Hebrew accounts to engage directly with the Iranian people.

Thousands have taken to Twitter as the hashtag #WalkTogether trended across London on the 10th anniversary of the London 7/7 bombings in which 52 people were killed. It urges commuters to leave their Tubes a stop early and walk, remembering the afternoon of the attack when thousands took to London’s streets as public transport network shut.

Democratic presidential underdog Martin O'Malley took a swipe Friday at front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton for mishandling the Arab Spring revolution in Libya and the subsequent deadly terrorist attack on the U.S.

October 12, 2014

NBC terrorism analyst Evan Kohlmann explains how ISIS uses social media such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter to recruit young people who are sympathetic to their cause. Kohlmann describes how ISIS has surpassed groups like Al Qaeda in recruitment thanks to these outreach tools.

Digital behavior, trends, and opportunities can raise awareness of particular issues in a country. This extends well beyond, for example, simply posting a few tweets as a form of diplomacy. According to Ambassador Rudolf Bekink of the Embassy of the Netherlands, “the digital arena opens new possibilities, from one-on-one conversations to dialogues with communities.” Traditional diplomacy is still relevant, he says, “but digital diplomacy adds enormously to the capabilities of every diplomat.” 

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