brexit

As the UK prepares to leave the EU, it has a huge number of considerations to ensure its economy prospers. One, which is perhaps overlooked, is Britain’s language policy and how important this is as an economic resource. A strategic language policy and the cultivation of language experts in post-Brexit Britain are essential if it wants to connect with fresh markets overseas. This has long been a feature of international diplomacy—stretching back long before globalization as we know it. 

The Prince of Wales has arrived at Pisa airport in Italy for the second part of his Brexit charm offensive in the EU. He'll spend the next five days here where he will visit the Ponte Vecchio in Florence, travel to war graves on the Austrian border, tour the 2016 earthquake-hit town of Amatrice, and meet the Pope at the Vatican. It's part of the Royal Family's mission this year, to charm their way around the EU.

March 31, 2017

In light of the United Kingdom pending departure from the European Union, PD News headlines explored Britain’s public diplomacy and diplomatic relations. 

Brexit challenges Britain's global image of openness and tolerance, but Cool Britannia has what it takes to avoid being suddenly rebranded as uncool just because it quits the EU, advertising professionals say. [...] "The things that make British culture unique remain. Music, fashion, British content, creative content, television, film. I would say all those things are not at risk, because they are driven by creative people," said Scheckner.

Speaking to an audience of industry leaders, Carolyn will praise the UK’s reputation as the world’s creative centre. The sector’s positive economic and cultural impact plays a vital role promoting the UK to the rest of the world. As new opportunities open up in both established and emerging markets post-Brexit, Carolyn will outline how important it is that a new migration system cements the UK’s global reputation for this industry.

British Universities have always been considered the global gold standard for quality but Brexit, in combination with reduced government funding, immigration policy, a changing 18 year-old demographic and the Higher Education and Research Bill, has created ‘A Perfect Storm’ for the sector. Universities are big business. Last year there were 2.24 million students at British universities.

The soft power capabilities of the EU are weakening for a number of reasons, including institutional confusion, Brexit, the Refugee crisis, terrorism, the rise of populism, resistance among member states to further enlargement given the Union’s economic problems. [...] Given this situation, political developments in the Western Balkans that have a direct impact on regional security must be closely monitored.

According to a UNESCO report in 2012, South Africa, the US, and Canada are among the most popular destinations for Nigerian students. But they are dwarfed in popularity by the UK with nearly 18,000 Nigerian students annually. The cultural and educational exchange organisation, the British Council, estimated that Nigerians would become the second biggest cohort of foreign students in the UK after Chinese in the coming years, with one MP estimating the number will reach 30,000. That was before the Brexit vote.

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