venezuela

Pope Francis with Enrique Peña Nieto

An exploration of the Catholic Church's faith diplomacy and its impact on international relations.

Through its Petrocaribe initiative, Venezuela has sold discounted oil to energy-deficient clients, practically giving it away in some cases. Lately, however, that generosity has diminished with Venezuela's economic misfortunes, hastened by tumbling global prices for oil -- the country's only viable source of export revenues. Even Brazil, with a fraction of Venezuela's reserves, now pumps 25 percent more oil.

Venezuelan delicacies like “arepas” and “tizana” are suddenly all the rage in the streets of Lima, considered the gastronomic capital of Latin America, thanks to the flood of Venezuelans moving to Peru in recent months to escape the deadly economic crisis into which their country has fallen. From students to engineers, from mechanics to reporters, Venezuelans are finding that selling their favorite foods in the streets is the first step toward settling in Peru [.]

In July 2014, Xi Jinping, the President of China, toured Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela, and Cuba, all of which had leftist governments at the time. [...] Xi declared that Chinese-Argentine relations would reach “unprecedented new horizons.” [...] As of two years ago, it seemed that China and many countries in Latin America were moving unequivocally toward a future of closer cooperation and economic affinity.

Digital sites like La Pública in Bolivia, El Pitazo in Venezuela and global site Rising Voices are establishing relationships with low-income, rural and indigenous communities. The idea is to produce their own news agendas different from those of traditional media. The sites give voice to community problems and support the creation of media that come from the communities.

"Venezuela has a lot to offer in terms of art and culture. We have already opened a cultural centre in New Delhi. ICMEI is going to be the extension of our efforts. All are invited to be a part of these two centres at Noida and Delhi. We have grown much bigger in one day," said the Ambassador, appreciating the large network of 162 countries of ICMEI.

The U.S. presidential race isn't only drawing attention and controversy in the United States -- it's being closely watched across the globe. But what does the rest of the world think about a campaign that has already thrown up one surprise after another? 

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