immigrants

Human Flow Official Trailer [HD] | Amazon Studios

Directed by Ai Weiwei, a new documentary captures the breadth of the ongoing global migration crisis.

A brand new interview with the Pulitzer Prize-winning author on the language we use to describe migrants.

Overcoming barriers is part of every immigrant's struggle. African women living in Germany have been sharing their experiences in a meeting intended to boost morale and better equip them to deal with life here. [...] The gathering was the brainchild of Sierra Leonean Sarah Bomkapre Kamara, a co-founder of Moving Women Empowerment. Kamara, a PhD student in Munich, brought the women together to discuss issues which are particularly common among African women.

Never before had the chief executive officer of fast-food chain McDonald’s Germany sat at the table when Chancellor Angela Merkel met with captains of the country’s biggest corporations. [...] But the CEO, Holger Beeck, was there in September at the Bundeskanzleramt because McDonald’s has hired 900-plus refugees, more than any other company at the meeting. The subject of the meeting was integrating those fleeing war in Syria and other dire conditions.

A handful of young immigrants who were brought illegally to the United States from México as children will now have the opportunity to travel to reconnect with their roots, improve their Spanish proficiency and learn about their homeland.
 

Officials estimate more than 57,000 unaccompanied children have been detained after entering the US so far this year, a one hundred percent increase from 2013. This led US President Barack Obama, among others, to label this flow of under-aged immigrants a “humanitarian crisis.” 

In England, it was called the Tebbit Test. The right-wing politician Norman Tebbit suggested in 1990 that immigrants from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean would not be truly assimilated until they supported their new country, rather than their respective homelands, in cricket. Thankfully, we have no such test in the United States; in a nation of immigrants, plenty of people feel allegiance to more than one team. But why is the American World Cup squad winning over more and more people with strong links to other nations?

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